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FAQs

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Q: What is Influuent?

A: UT System created the Influuent website to promote and expand the research, knowledge creation, and innovation of UT faculty. With free online resources and tools that foster discovery and connection, the Influuent website is geared to meet internal and external needs. Please read more on our About page.

Q: Who is featured on Influuent?

A: It is our goal to feature all UT System researchers on this site by linking to their research profiles, highlighting exciting research projects and other scholarly work. Additionally, the site features initiatives sponsored by UT System. We will continue to enhance the site to include more.

The research profiles feature publications auto-populated from the Scopus database. Scopus is the largest database of abstracts and citations. It currently focuses primarily on STEM and medical research areas, and has been chosen by the National Science Foundation to act as the primary source for NSF's National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics "Science and Engineering Indicators" report. In addition, Scopus will be the source for the publication data for the Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

Because Scopus is heavily focused on STEM and medical publications, it does not provide a complete representation of researcher output for those in the social sciences, liberal arts/humanities, and fine arts. Scopus is expanding their publications to include more in these fields, so this should improve over time.

Q: Is it okay for me to contact researchers I find in the Experts tool?

A: Yes. It is our understanding that most researchers at our institutions welcome inquiries from colleagues, industry, and media. If you do not get a response after contacting a researcher, consider contacting their research office directly in case they overlooked your inquiry.

Q: What is the UT System Experts Community tool?

A: This online tool is an easy-to-use, searchable database featuring available university researchers and related resources, such as core facilities. It is a single point of access for researchers, businesses, media, and entrepreneurs.

Q: How can the UT System Experts Community help me?

A: The Portal can help you identify university resources relevant to a challenge or problem you are working on. Use the search tool to find information about faculty experts, available facilities, and possibly intellectual property. Your search results will guide you to those resources.

Q: How are the research profiles populated?

A: Influuent has partnered with Elsevier to implement their researcher profiling tool. Each UT institution submits a list of researchers to Elsevier and profiles are automatically generated. The profiles include publications populated from the Scopus database. Other data may have also been added for some UT institutions based on separate data uploads, such as grant information. Additionally, researchers may enhance their own profiles to include additional academic achievements.

Q: What is Scopus?

A: Scopus is the world's largest abstract and citation databases of peer-reviewed research output such as scientific journals, books and conference proceedings. It covers nearly 22,000 titles from over 5,000 publishers and the database is constantly being updated. It focuses primarily on STEM and medical research areas, and has been chosen by the National Science Foundation to act as the primary source for NSF's National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics "Science and Engineering Indicators" report. In addition, Scopus will be the source for the publication data for the Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

Because Scopus is heavily focused on STEM and medical publications, it does not provide a complete representation of researcher output for those in the social sciences, liberal arts/humanities, and fine arts. Scopus is expanding their publications to include more in these fields, so this should improve over time.

Q: How are the research “Fingerprints” determined?

A: A back-end software system, the Elsevier Fingerprint Engine mines the text of academic documents – publication abstracts, funding announcements and awards, project summaries, patents, proposals/applications, and other sources – to create an index of weighted terms, “the Fingerprint”. By applying a wide range of thesauri, Elsevier can develop solutions for researchers in but not limited to: the life sciences, engineering, earth and environmental sciences, arts and humanities, social sciences, mathematics and agriculture.

Q: I looked in the Experts tool at my profile, and it does not list all of my academic accomplishments. Why are pieces missing?

A: The Elsevier Experts database pulls from Scopus, which is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature. Even though it contains data from 5,000 publishers and nearly 22,000 titles, it may not have the journal that you publish in. Additionally, the profiles do not contain other academic achievements that you may want to add. These might include information on conference proceedings, honors, awards, patents, grants, and more. Your Elsevier profile may be editable in the future (see FAQ below).

Q: How do I log into my Research Profile to make updates?

A: Each institution site should be set up to have "single sign on" capability in the near future. This means you will be able to use your institution network ID and password (that you use every day) to access your profile. This is coming soon.

Q: I want to find colleagues who work on the same type of research that I am interested in. How can I find them?

A: Use the UT System Experts Community search tool to enter in keywords that describe your research area. In your search results, you will see a list of researchers who have published on the same or similar topics. You can then investigate their research and decide who you would like to contact.

Q: I want to find funding opportunities for my research area. Where can I look?

A: The Elsevier Funding tool is a great resource for finding funding opportunities. You must be on the UT institution network to access the tool.

Q: My search results are not what I expect. Please help.

A: If you are getting too few results, too many results or simply not what you expect, consider these tips:

  • Tip 1: Search synonyms for terms you are searching. For example, instead of “cancer”, try “oncology”.
  • Tip 2: Search for publication-specific terms rather than general subject areas. For example, if you are searching for a topic in obstetrics, like “iron supplements”, search “iron supplements during pregnancy” instead of just “pregnancy” or “obstetrics”.
  • Tip 3: Search for research subjects instead of researcher areas. Example, search “Civil War” instead of “historian,” to find a certain civil war historian.

Q: Why are the search results different for a search on the main UT System Influuent website than the same search on an institution's Influuent portal?

A: The search engines themselves are different and focus on different types of content. On the main UT System Influuent site, only titles, abstracts, and fingerprints/keywords are available to be searched. Your search results will always consist of researchers with expertise related to your search terms or facilities associated with those terms. On the institutional Influuent sites, more content types are being searched: experts, concepts, research outputs, research units, and equipment. The search results reflect this, and include all of these content types.

Q: What are Indirect Cost Rates?

A: Unlike private foundations, the Federal Government acknowledges that it costs money to run our institutions above and beyond providing direct services. These may include administrative overhead, grant management, office space, utilities, fundraising, and marketing, etc. The federal government has a standardized method of determining an institution's indirect costs, which results in a negotiated Indirect Cost Rate. These figures are usually plugged in as a part of any grant proposal. Your institution’s rates are shown here, but are available from your Research office.

Q: I want to conduct research involving animal or human subjects. Where do I go to get information on the policies surrounding these types of projects?

A: The UT System Center for the Regulation of Science is an online resource for this type of policy information. Additionally, your institution has a research compliance area that has outlined steps that need to be followed for research of this type.

Q: I have created a great technology that I am ready to send to the marketplace. What do I do next?

A: Contact your Office of Technology Commercialization office and talk to them about the next steps in technology transfer.